Young Afghans are turning to poetry to defy the burden of conflict

From a report in the UN News Centre:

Much of Afghanistan’s newfound love of poetic expression – which has taken hold in Kabul and Kandahar as well – is coming from young Afghans seeking new ways to interact and express themselves.

The Citadel of Herat, in western Afghanistan, which dates back to 300 BC and was restored by UNESCO in the 1970s. Photo: UNAMA/Fraidoon Poya

Read the full story here.

Advertisements

Poetry for peace in Pakistan’s KP province

Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province has been ravaged by war for a decade now. Poets from the region have joined forces to spread the dsc04774message of peace. More than 300 books have been written on the subject of “peace” over the last decade.

 

Read more about the peace poetry movement in Asia Times.

 

New volume on poetry and the Algerian War

“Editealgerian-ward by Francis Combes and translated by Alan Dent, Poets and the Algerian War (Smokestack, £7.99) features some of the French poets who opposed the war, including Louis Aragon, Jacques Gaucheron, Riffaud, Henri Deluy and Guillevic, as well as Algerian poets like Jean Senac, Kateb Yacine, Bachir Hadj Ali, Noureddine Aba and Mohamed Saleh Baouiya.”

More here.

 

Poetry on the ugliness of war

Tehran-baseddsc_1429 Hoonaar Publication has released a collection of poems called ‘Longing for Peace’ (in Persian ‘Dar Arezou-e Solh’). The collection comprises 81 poems by 70 renowned poets from across the world, who have portrayed the cruelty and ugliness of war. The poems have been translated by author, poet, literary researcher and translator Ziauddin Khosrowshah.

More here.